Insects of the Los Angeles Basin

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Insects of the Los Angeles Basin

SKU: 9780938644446

$34.95 $31.46 Member Price

INSECTS OF THE LOS ANGELES BASIN

 Did you know…..

….that the larvae of the Petroleum Fly lives submerged in natural asphalt oozing to the surface at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wilshire Boulevard? 

….that large praying mantis have been known to capture and eat hummingbirds? 

….that when threatened, bombardier beetles emit a puff of smoke, along with a popping, crackling sound? 

All of these are insects found right here in Los Angeles, including some in your own backyard! 

Updated for the first time in over 20 years, Insects of the Los Angeles Basin is THE best local and regional insect guide to more than 400 species of common or conspicuous insects and over 50 species of spiders, scorpions, mites, ticks and more. Inside you’ll discover:

  • New names and classifications of insects – including new species
  • Stunning color photography that makes it easy to identify everything from common household pests to rarely-seen specimens of unique L.A. species
  • Latest information on basic biology, habitats, conservation, and more on local insects and invertebrates
  • Over 500 photographs and detailed line drawings
  • Urban legends, misconceptions, and surprising facts that will impress even the most squeamish insectophobe
  • Updated preface by Dr. Brian Brown, curator of entomology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

An engaging read for any Angeleno, this book is a must-have resource for nature enthusiasts, gardeners, teachers, students, campers, and anyone curious to learn more about the diversity of insects that share our city.

By Charles L. Hogue, Revised and Edited by James N. Hogue
Paperback:  474 pages.
Publisher: Hogue Feb. 2015